“Because of Le-Vel…” I am…dead?

MLM has been compared to a cult. The cliche fits because both involve prescriptive beliefs, members only and members only rules, non-disclosure agreements, scams to make money and ultimately, ruin and doom for those who drink the Kool-Aid and sign their lives away to these schemes.

In the two years Shan’ann Watts was involved, she went completely over to the dark side. She wore the t-shirts, it took over her social media, it took over her family, it took over her mind. Even her phone was branded with the Le-Vel logo.

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Below are a few screengrabs from one of Shan’ann’s Live videos. They reveal the particular flavor of Kool-Aid the Le-Vel cult was drinking.

At the very bottom is Shan’ann’s prayer flag, sticky-taped onto a makeshift shrine to Le-Vel.

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Because of Le-Vel Shan’ann Watts was able to retire at 33-years-old. That’s quite a boast. Is it true?

And then there’s this:

Because of Le-Vel I have my life back.

But did it give her her life, or cost her her life?

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7 thoughts on ““Because of Le-Vel…” I am…dead?

  1. Shan’ann was a liar, which made her a good candidate for screwing over others as she recruited her prey/downline people, her “team.” She was able to “retire at 33.” Really? She had “retired” on Chris’s salary, which the Watts family could ill afford for her to do with a big mortgage, two children, and a third on the way.

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    • It’s not nice to say, but yes – a liar. I think it’s impossible not to suggest anyone who starts with and sticks with MLM is ultimately lying to themselves and everyone else. Chris Watts was also a Thrive promoter btw.

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      • The more I learn about Shan’ann the less inclined I am to be nice to her memory. I think being “nice” by trying to appease Shan’ann, who ruled the Watts household, resulted in an out-of-control financial mess and family tragedy, which includes Chris.

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      • Chris does not have the personality to be a promoter, not in the least.
        I bet you my last dime that it was HER running his thrive stuff, it was HER who got him to sign up to be a promoter, it was HER sending his friends messages about thrive under his account so they thought it was him.

        She was a brainwashed idiot who seemed to prefer this bullshit to a real job and making an honest living.

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      • Brainwashed is right. We don’t know for sure what was going on on his side of the Thrive coin because his Facebook account is gone. We do know he was actively wearing the Thrive-branded shirts and attended the San Diego Thrive thing in June. Don’t forget he lost a ton of weight, and he was the one having an affair, so maybe he wasn’t as bad at promotion as one might expect.

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  2. I’ve become very cynical in my years now, and that’s not a good place to be either. I can look at every commercial and crack the code. I can hear what they aren’t saying. I see media manipulation in a way I never did before. Are all sales people liars? We as consumers want something – and as soon as a need is identified there is someone to sell you something to satisfy that need. Sha’nann had a need. She wanted to be someone, she wanted a purpose bigger than her marriage, her children, her house. She had been sick and she wanted to feel well. In order to succeed in that purpose she had to totally immerse herself in the company philosophy and sell it to others. Is that any different from selling cars or in the old days aluminum siding, brushes and vacuum cleaners and encyclopedias? To get good at sales you have to totally believe in your product and that it’s the best product and that everyone needs that product or you will fail at sales. In Thrive they are selling an “experience” – so much more than the powders and patches. In Mary Kay we were selling an “opportunity.” Scott Peterson was a failure at sales. He was a lazy fertilizer salesman. Hard to get inspired selling S t isn’t it? He could have been, had he at all paid attention to the needs of the agricultural community he was selling to. He told some woman in a jail house letter that “my college diploma only required that I could drive a tractor and herd a few steers.” A little disillusioned perhaps? Life didn’t turn out the way he thought it should have. The reality was he had a job in sales, a wife and a baby on the way. The illusion was he could have been a pro-golfer. Which did he prefer – reality or the illusion.

    And with MLM’s you have to believe that other people doing what you are doing will bring them what they want or you will fail. But the scam of the MLM’s are that an honest assessment of where you are after a certain period of time is not encouraged. You begin to see that that magical 1% at the top can only be attained by a very few. When you stop after a few years and see that you are spending more than you are earning all the while being told you have to spend to earn then you see that everyone in your “cult” believed it too. Group think. Keep trying. You’ve invested so much, either turn back or keep going.

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